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Master of Science in Nutrition and Health Promotion

Prerequisites

Applicants must hold an undergraduate degree from a regionally accredited U.S. college or university or an overseas institution of higher learning recognized by the Ministry of Education in the home country. The following prerequisite courses are required and may be taken at any U.S. regionally accredited colleges or universities or a higher education institution abroad which is recognized by the Ministry of Education in the home country. Courses may be in progress at the time of application, but, if accepted, the applicant must complete all prerequisites before the start of the program:

  • Inorganic Chemistry with a lab (at Simmons, CHEM 111 or CHEM 113)
  • Organic Chemistry with a lab (at Simmons, CHEM 112 or CHEM 114)
  • Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II with labs (at Simmons, BIOL 231 and BIOL 232)
  • Introductory Nutrition* (at Simmons, NUTR 111* or NUTR 112)
  • Introduction to Community Nutrition (at Simmons, NUTR 237)
  • Introductory Biochemistry (at Simmons, CHEM 223)
  • Introductory Statistics at (Simmons, MATH 118)

An overall GPA of 3.0 or better is required in the prerequisite courses and the accumualative(overall) GPA.
All science courses, with the exception of Biochemistry, must include labs and must have been completed at a regionally accredited U.S. college or university within ten years prior to the application deadline. These prerequisite courses must be graded and may not be completed on a pass/fail basis or audited. Additionally, international students must be enrolled full time (at least nine credit hours each semester). CLEP, IB, or AP (Advanced Placement) scores are not accepted for such required courses.

There are two ways to complete the prerequisites:

  1. complete courses elsewhere (call the Nutrition program directly at 617.521.2718 to determine if a specific class will fulfill our requirement) and then apply;
  2. take classes at Simmons by applying to the Dix Scholars Program via the Office of Undergraduate Admission.

Simmons Prereq Equivalents

BIOL 231 Anatomy and Physiology I (4 sem. hrs.)

Prereq: One year each of college biology and chemistry.

Presents an integrated approach to the fundamental facts and concepts of human anatomy and physiology. Emphasizes the cellular basis of membrane excitability and hormone action, neurobiology, and musculoskeletal system and motor control. Laboratory includes histology, gross anatomy, and physiological experiments.

BIOL 232 Anatomy and Physiology II (4 sem. hrs.)

Prereq: One year each of college biology and chemistry; BIOL 231 recommended.

Introduces structural relationships and functional integration of major systems of the human body, with emphasis on reproductive, respiratory, renal, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and defense systems. Laboratory includes histology, gross anatomy, and physiological experiments.

CHEM 111 Introductory Chemistry: Inorganic (4 sem. hrs.)

Covers basic concepts with special reference to inorganic compounds, including chemical equations, the Periodic Table, chemical bonding, and equilibrium. Assumes no previous knowledge of the subject or sophisticated background in mathematics. Laboratory correlates with and amplifies the lecture material and presents fundamental laboratory techniques, including instrumental methods. Three lectures, one discussion period, and one laboratory per week.

CHEM 112 Introductory Chemistry: Organic (4 sem . hrs. )

Prereq: CHEM 111 or CHEM 113.

Covers nature of the covalent bond, structure of organic compounds, and their reactions and reaction mechanisms. Introduces structure and biochemical functions of compounds important to life. Three lectures, one discussion period, and one laboratory per week. For the concentrator in the paramedical or science-related field.

CHEM 113 Principles of Chemistry (4 sem . hrs.)

Prereq: A satisfactory score on the Simmons chemistry placement examination.

Provides a quantitative development of a few fundamental topics: connections between chemical behavior and molecular structure, with special reference to molecular modeling; dynamic chemical processes; and energy, entropy, and chemical equilibrium. Emphasizes applications of chemistry to real-world problems. Laboratory introduces quantitative techniques, including instrumental methods, for studying chemical systems. Three lectures, one discussion period, and one laboratory per week.

CHEM 114 Organic Chemistry I (4 sem . hrs.)

Prereq: CHEM 111 or CHEM 113.

Covers fundamental concepts of atomic structure, hybridization, molecular orbitals, and structure of organic molecules. Surveys functional groups, classes of organic compounds, and their reactions. Provides in-depth mechanistic study of those reactions, involving energies, stereochemistry, equilibrium, and reaction rate theory. Three lectures, one discussion period, and one laboratory per week.

CHEM 223 Introductory Biochemistry (4 sem. hrs.)

Prereq: CHEM 114 or CHEM 112.

Covers chemical processes in living organisms, with special emphasis on human nutrition. Studies carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and enzymes; their function in living systems; and their metabolic pathways and regulation. Three lectures per week.

MATH 118 Introductory Statistics (4 sem. hrs.)

Prereq: High school algebra and completion of the competency in basic mathematics requirement.

Intended primarily for students in the biological, behavioral, or social sciences. Covers elementary principles of probability, binomial, and normal distributions; sample statistics; estimation and testing of statistical hypotheses; and linear regression and correlation. Does not count toward the mathematics major. Please note: a special section (MATH 118MG) is designed for management students.

NUTR 111 Fundamentals of Nutrition Science (4 sem. hrs.)

Studies these basic concepts: functions of nutrients in the human organism, nutrient needs at varying stages of the life cycle, and nutrition status. Examines the health effects of nutrient inadequacies and excesses. Discusses the scientific basis of recommended nutrient intake and dietary guidelines for the US population. Includes lecture and laboratory. Laboratory experimentation demonstrates or tests the nutrition principles presented in the lecture.

NUTR 112 Introduction to Nutrition Science (4 sem. hrs.)

Studies the functions of nutrients and their requirement in the body, their effects on health, and nutrient needs during different stages of the life cycle. Discusses the effects of nutrient deficiencies and excesses as well as the dietary reference intakes and guidelines for the US population.

NUTR 237 The Practice of Community Nutrition (4 sem. hrs.)

Prereq: NUTR 111 and consent of the instructor.

Studies community nutrition, the practice of applied nutrition and nutrition education in both health care and other settings. Emphasizes the principles of education that are basic to effective learning by the clients. Examines federal programs aimed at nutrition-related health problems. Includes assignments to community fieldwork placements (outside of regular class time). Requires proof of MMR vaccination and a negative TB test.