Distinguished Scholar Speaker Series

The Distinguished Scholar Speaker Series highlights new, cutting-edge research relevant to CGO's work and mission. Each lecture combines discussions on theory and practice, offering opportunities to discuss the practical implications of recent findings and ways to apply them to our own situations.

To RSVP for an event, e-mail cgo@simmons.edu.

Look out for our 2014-2015 Speaker Series event schedule soon!


Wednesday, October 29, 2014

"New Rules for Women: Revolutionizing the Way Women Work Together"


The issue of women working with women is fraught with stereotypes, platitudes and misperceptions that can lead to negative outcomes not only for women but also for their ability to do good work together. Please join us as Anne Litwin guides us through New Rules for Women, her recently published book detailing important new concepts in understanding the subtle—often invisible—gender dynamics that influence women's workplace relationships. This is a practical workshop—focused on tips, tools and exercises—that will give us ways to push back on negative stereotypes as well as reclaim parts of our workplace experience that have been misunderstood and devalued. You (whether a woman or a man), the women you work with, and the women who work for you all stand to benefit from this workshop! Signed books will be available for purchase after the presentation.

Time:12 noon to 2 p.m.

Location:Simmons School of Management, Fifth Floor, Room M-501, 300 The Fenway, Boston

Biography

Dr. Anne Litwin has been a consultant, coach and trainer for more than thirty years in a wide variety of organizations throughout the world. Anne's lifelong interest in the unique dynamics among women in a wide range of work environments is at the forefront of the research in her latest book, New Rules for Women: Revolutionizing the Way Women Work Together. In her 30 years of diversity and organizational change work, Anne has developed a passion for unleashing the leadership potential of women in organizations and helping organizations groom their talented women as future leaders. She feels that one key to increasing the retention of talented women is to strengthen the ability of both female and male managers to create supportive environments where both female and male staff can flourish.


Thursday, November 13, 2014

"Rwandan Women: Educating and Training for a Hopeful Future"


In 100 days in 1994, Rwandans experienced a genocide of somewhere between 500,000 to 1,000,000 of its people, or 20% of its population. Tragically, the international community largely stood by and did little to stop the violence. Twenty years later, various international organizations are working to bring hope to and strengthen Rwandan women through education and training programs. Come hear about the work of three of these organizations as represented by our speakers: Ms. Masayo Kodama, Founder and President, Reborn Kyoto, Japan; Dr. Joyce Fletcher, Chair of the Board, the Maranyundo Initiative of Boston; and Dr. Nanette Veilleux, Professor, Simmons College and U.S. Fulbright Program.

Time: 12:30 to 2 p.m.

Location: Simmons College, LeFavour Hall, First Floor, Kotzen Room, 300 The Fenway, Boston

Biographies

Ms. Masayo Kodama, President, Reborn Kyoto founded the non-profit organization in 1979 in Kyoto, Japan. Since then staff and volunteers from Reborn Kyoto have taught people in Cambodia, Vietnam, Yemen, Laos, Sri Lanka, Jordan, and Rwanda to restyle donated Japanese kimonos—traditional silk garments holding important cultural significance—into contemporary clothing for Japanese and American markets. Today with a grant from Japan's Foreign Affairs Ministry, Reborn Kyoto runs a substantial training program in Rwanda.

Professor Joyce K. Fletcher an international authority on leadership and the interaction of gender and power in the workplace, is also a bold philanthropist. Several years ago she joined forces with a group of visionary women from Boston and Rwanda to build a middle school of excellence for economically vulnerable girls in Nyamata, Rwanda. The Maranyundo Girls School opened in 2008 and has exceeded all expectations, quickly becoming one of the top schools in the country. Fletcher served as Chair of the Board of the Maranyundo Initiative from 2010 to 2014 and remains an active board member and strong supporter of the school. She visits Rwanda regularly and has witnessed first hand the power of girls education and women's leadership in this remarkable country.

Nanette Veilleux, PhD is a Professor of Computer Science and Informatics at Simmons College. Her primary research involves computation models of prosody and pedagogical methods to increase STEM retention and support student success. Professor Veilleux taught at the Kigali Institute of Science and Technology as a Fulbright Scholar in Fall 2013.


Wednesday, December 10, 2014

"Who will you become? How our professional and family identities are co-constructed and shaped by critical social influences"


Past research on professional identity and social influence has focused primarily on the impact of work role models on shaping professional identities.  Consistent with research on multiple identities, Rachel Arnett's research finds that the process is much more complex, and sometimes differs for women and men. Her findings suggest that professional identity construction is a dynamic and evolving process that co-occurs with the construction of personal and family-related identities. These identities are impacted not only by work role models but also by non-professional role models such as one's parents.  These myriad social influences are critical to one's understandings of the self and who one can become, driving one's hopes, igniting fears, or causing disruption to longstanding expectations. Rachel will present her findings, lead us through an exercise to reflect on our own identity construction process, and provide a framework to explore the practical implications for us as we navigate our own careers and professional environments.

Time: 12 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Location: Simmons School of Management, Fifth Floor, Room M-501, 300 The Fenway, Boston

Biography

Rachel Arnett is a Doctoral Candidate at Harvard Business School, in the Organizational Behavior unit. Her research illuminates the complex dynamics involved in professional identity construction and management. Her work examines individuals ranging in career stages - from the threshold of their careers to the pinnacle of leadership and achievement. She investigates how individuals craft and communicate their professional identities, and how these processes are complicated or enhanced by a variety of factors, including non-work identities, strong social influences, critical events, everyday encounters, and organizational interventions. Before Harvard, Rachel was a researcher in New York University's Social Psychology department and a Senior Brand Strategist at WPP's Young & Rubicam Advertising. Rachel received her Bachelor of Arts from the University of Pennsylvania.


Thursday, May 15, 2014

"‘Zoom In, Zoom Out': Exploring Goals, Behaviors and Outcomes of Managerial Distance and Closeness"

Leaders' distance from followers and intimacy in leader-follower relationships can have a meaningful effect on followers' and leaders' behaviors, emotions and cognitions. In the current study, different aspects of distance were explored, among which are physical distance, hierarchical distance, frequency of interaction and social distance. In the current study, we first present and explore the notion of ‘doing distance,' which refers to leaders' ability to actively shape the way they are perceived by followers as near or far from them. Our goal was to draw from theories of leadership, distance, identity and gender in order to develop a conceptual framework on the underlying mechanisms that enable women and men leaders to influence their followers' perceptions of their distance from the leader and, ultimately, affect their behaviors and organizational-related outcomes. We used the critical incident approach. Incidents of enacted distance were generated by 97 managers and 100 employees and open ended questionnaires were completed. The qualitative analysis shows that managers distance is motivated by different goals and effects, varying identity dynamics and follower outcomes. Gendered aspects and implications for theory and practice will be presented and discussed.

Time: 12 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Location: Simmons College, LeFavour Hall, 4th Floor, L-428

Biography

Ronit Kark is a Tenured Senior Lecturer of organizational studies in the Department of Psychology at Bar-Ilan University in Israel. Dr. Kark received her Ph.D. from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and completed her postdoctoral studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA. She was also a visiting professor at the University of Queensland in Australia (QU) and at New York University (NYU). Her work has been published in various leading journals, including The Academy of Management Review, The Leadership Quarterly, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Organization, Journal of Organization Change Management and Journal of Applied Psychology. Dr. Kark was on the editorial boards of The Academy of Management Journal, The Leadership Quarterly and The International Journal of Management Review. Her current research interests include leadership, positive relationships and relatedness in organizations, identity and identification processes, gender dynamics in organizations and the role of play in creativity at work. She is the founder and first director of the graduate program ‘Gender in the Field: Linking Theory and Practice' in the Gender Studies Department at Bar-Ilan University. She received the Loreal-Rekanati Prize for the Study of Women and Management in Israel, for her doctoral dissertation. In 2005 she was awarded the Best Paper Prize at the International Leadership Association (ILA) and the Academy of Management 2012 Award for the Scholarly Contributions to Educational Practice Advancing Women in Leadership. Dr. Kark also has extensive experience as a practitioner and an activist focusing on advancing women's rights, women's empowerment, women's advancement to higher positions, and the development of strategy and tools for capacity building. She has acquired a sound training as an organizational psychologist and consultant. Over the years she has focused on projects that are related to women's advancement and leadership and has worked with many different types of organizations in the public, private and third sector (NGOs) on diverse types of projects. Last, she serves voluntarily on the advisory committees and boards of different NGOs in Israel that aim to change women's rights and access to power (e.g., The Abraham Fund for Jewish-Arab Co-existence, Studio of Her Own, Women's Leadership in Business and Women in the Film).


Tuesday, May 13, 2014

"Shattering the Myth of Separate Worlds: Negotiating Non-Work Identities at Work"

How much of our self is defined by our work? Fundamental changes in the social organization of work are destabilizing the relationship between work and the self. As a result, parts of the self traditionally considered outside the domain of work, i.e., "non-work" identities, are increasingly affected by organizations and occupations. Based on an interdisciplinary review of literature on identity and work we develop a model of how people negotiate non-work identities (e.g., national, gender, family) in the context of organizational/occupational pressures and personal preferences regarding this identity. We propose that the dual forces of pressures and preferences vary from inclusion (e.g., incorporating the non-work identity within the work identity) to exclusion (e.g., keeping the identities separate). We suggest that the alignment or misalignment of these pressures and preferences shapes peoples' experience of the power relationship between themselves and their organization/occupation and affects how they manage their non-work identities. We describe how people enact different non-work identity management strategies—namely assenting to, complying with, resisting, or inverting the pressures—and delineate the consequences of these strategies for people and their organizations/occupations.

Time: 12 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Location: Simmons School of Management, 5th Floor, M-501

Biographies

Lakshmi Ramarajan is an Assistant Professor in the Organizational Behavior Unit at Harvard Business School. Her research examines the management and consequences of identities in organizations.

Lakshmi's research examines how people can work fruitfully across social divides, with a particular emphasis on identities, group boundaries and intergroup relations. Her research asks two broad questions related to bridging differences across multiple identities and group boundaries: 1) What are the effects of managing multiple identities on interpersonal and intergroup relations? and 2) How do organizational and intergroup boundaries influence individuals' multiple identities and intergroup relationships? In recent work she examines how individuals' manage their organizational, ethnic, religious and national identities, and how these identities interact to influence interpersonal problem solving and prosocial attitudes and behavior.

Lakshmi earned her B.A. (Honors) in International Relations from Wellesley College, her M.Sc. in International Relations from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and her PhD in Management from The Wharton School of Business. She was awarded the State Farm Foundation Dissertation Proposal Award in 2008. She was a Post Doctoral Fellow at Harvard Business School from 2008 to 2010.

Prior to her academic career, Lakshmi worked in international development, managing conflict resolution programs in West Africa with a focus on gender and workforce development. She was also a professional dancer for several years.

Erin Reid studies gender inequality and identity dynamics in work settings. She is especially interested in how men and women cope with time-greedy work, and the implications of their coping mechanisms for their own lives as well as the organizations for which they work. She takes a sociological perspective in her research and uses both qualitative and quantitative methods. Her research has been published or is forthcoming in the Academy of Management Review, Strategic Management Journal, Journal of Business Ethics, the Academy of Management Best Paper Proceedings, and has received multiple awards. Prior to her academic career, Erin worked for a small social policy research company, on education and labor market policy for Canadian government, and as a dietary aide for a nursing home.


Wednesday, April 30, 2014

"Scientific Performance Assessment through a Gender Lens: A Case Study on Evaluation and Selection Practices in Academia"

"Gender doesn't matter! What we want is the best. The person that fits the picture the best." (Head of Department, Aarhus University)

The increased focus on excellence and quality assurance in the national and international research systems has triggered a significant expansion in the use of quantitative metrics and indicators in the assessment of research performance. In this presentation, Mathias Wullum Nielsen draws attention to the organizational consequences of this development - through a gender lens. Nielsen raises three main questions: (a) How is scientific performance assessed in the recruitment and promotion of academic staff?, (b) What are the potential gender consequences related to the expanding use of quantitative metrics and indicators in this process?, and (c) What emphasis is given to performance measures of this kind in the final selection of applicants for senior research positions? The presentation draws on the findings of a comprehensive mixed-methods case-study on processes of evaluation and selection in the recruitment of senior research staff at a Danish university (Aarhus University). Interestingly, the study reveals a number subtle gender biases related to the use of performance measures. First, quantitative performance assessments privilege research output over potential and reward traditional career paths and publication patterns, which may put women with career breaks (e.g. maternal leaves) and domestic commitments at a cumulative disadvantage. Second, a strong managerial emphasis on individual research output and impact promotes an individualistic and competitive environment, creating "chilly climates" for researchers with a propensity for more supportive and collegial working styles. Third, performance indicators and metrics are often slanted in favour of mainstream approaches, styles and methodologies. In this sense, focusing too strongly on such measures may not only disadvantage women, but also harm the organization as a whole, which expectedly, over time, will reduce cognitive diversity and work against scientific innovation and the development of new types of knowledge.

Time: 12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Location: Simmons School of Management, 5th Floor, M-501

Biography

Mathias Wullum Nielsen is a PhD fellow at Aarhus University, Denmark. He has a background in sociology and is currently writing his thesis on structural challenges to gender equality in academia. Mathias will be a visiting scholar at Simmons' Center for Gender in Organizations from February through June 2014.


Tuesday, April 15, 2014

"Talent Management from a Gender Perspective"

Our 2014 Women on Boards Report indicates once again that the largest and most enduring gap between male and female board seats remains at the level of executive directorships. In order to close that gap and generate a sustainable talent pool of women to the top, companies need to invest more effort in developing the pipeline of female talent internally. Recently we carried out a pilot project on the processes and practices that companies use to identify, develop and manage their talent, with a particular focus on practices that seem to be effective in pulling female talent through. Interviews were carried out with 23 senior managers in 12 major UK companies, including Heads of HR, Talent Management, Diversity and Inclusion, and Learning and Development. This presentation will highlight some of those good practices and where relevant, will relate the interview findings to key papers in the literature on talent management from a gender perspective.

Time: 12 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Location: Simmons School of Management, 5th Floor, M-501

Biography

Susan Vinnicombe is the Deloitte Ellen Gabriel Chair for Women and Leadership at the Simmons School of Management and a Faculty Affiliate at the Center for Gender in Organizations. Dr. Vinnicombe's particular research interests are gender diversity on corporate boards, women's leadership styles, and the issues involved in women developing their managerial careers. Her Research Center is unique in Europe with its focus on women leaders and the annual Female FTSE Report is regarded as the premier research resource on women directors in the UK. Dr. Vinnicombe has written ten books and over one hundred articles, reports and conference papers. Her latest book "Handbook of Research on Promoting Women's Careers" (with R. Burke, S. Blake-Beard and L. Moore) was published by Edward Elgar in 2013. Dr. Vinnicombe has consulted for organisations in over twenty countries including the UAE, the Philippines, Trinidad, Nigeria, Australia and New Zealand on how best to attract, retain and develop women executives. She is regularly interviewed in the press and on the radio and television for her expert views on women directors, and is a frequent keynote speaker at conferences. Dr. Vinnicombe is the founder and Chair of the judges for Women in the City Awards and a judge for the Sunday Times best NEDs of the year awards. She is Vice Patron of Working Families, a charity. She is also Visiting Professor of Curtin University, Graduate Business School, Perth, Australia. Dr. Vinnicombe is a member of the Davies Steering Committee.


Monday, March 31, 2014

"The Color Bind: Talking (and Not Talking) about Race at Work"

Organizations — from Fortune 500 companies and start-ups to social service agencies and health providers —regularly face issues related to race and ethnicity, but resist actually talking about them. We call this the color bind. This book grew out of a study of child welfare workers. We observed teams over several years to see how their members discussed race and ethnicity in their work, and found that most teams barely broached the topic. In fact, only one team regularly brought race or ethnicity into their conversations. We dug into what made this team different and gleaned some important lessons for a variety of organizational contexts.

The Color Bind shares in-depth case studies of this team and others, and outlines strategies—including modeling desired behavior and encouraging movement toward color cognizance—for organizations looking to transcend the color bind and engage race in ways that advance their mission and create trusting relationships.

Time: 12 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Location: Simmons School of Management, 5th Floor, M-501

Biographies

Erica Gabrielle Foldy is an Associate Professor of Public and Nonprofit Management at the Wagner Graduate School of Public Service at New York University. She is Faculty Co-Director of the Research Center for Leadership in Action, based at Wagner, and Affiliated Faculty with the Center for Gender in Organizations at the Simmons School of Management in Boston.

Professor Foldy's research addresses the question: What enables and inhibits working and learning together across potential divisions like race and gender, profession or differences of opinion? She is interested in how cognitive processes, like framing and sensemaking, affect our ability to connect with others, and how leaders act as "sensegivers" to affect their constituents' capacity for joint work.

Professor Foldy is co-author, with Tamara Buckley, of the forthcoming book The Color Bind: Talking (and not Talking) about Race at Work, published by Russell Sage. She also co-edited, with Robin Ely and Maureen Scully, the Reader in Gender, Work and Organization. She has also published articles in a variety of journals and edited volumes.

Prof Foldy holds a BA from Harvard College and a PhD from Boston College and was a Post Doctoral Fellow at Harvard Business School in 2002-03. During the 2007-08 academic year, she was a Visiting Scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation.

Tamara R. Buckley is an Associate Professor of Psychology and Counseling at The Graduate Center and Hunter College, City University of New York. She is also a New York State licensed psychologist providing psychotherapy and executive coaching services and works as a consultant for group relations conferences.

In the broadest sense, Professor Buckley's research is about racial-cultural competence, both building knowledge about how race and culture impact individuals and organizations and developing conceptual models for engaging race at work and in classrooms. Professor Buckley is co-author, with Erica Foldy, of the forthcoming book The Color Bind: Talking (and not Talking) about Race at Work, published by Russell Sage. She also published articles in a variety of journals and edited volumes and won an Early Career Psychology Award, American Psychological Association, Division 35, for her dissertation research on black adolescent girls racial and gender identity development and self-esteem.

Professor Buckley holds a BA from University of California at Berkeley, MA in organizational psychology and Ph.D. in counseling psychology from Columbia University, Teachers College. She was a Post Doctoral Fellow at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and was a Visiting Scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation in 2007-2008.


Monday, December 9, 2013

"The Relational Construction of Temporal Flexibility"

Individuals who are seeking a rewarding career while also engaging in satisfying personal life face difficult challenges. If they are able to determine when and how much to work—that is, if they have temporal flexibility—they can address those challenges better. And how can individuals create temporal flexibility? We find that expertise plays an important role in this process. First, managers with poor project management expertise impose constraints on temporal flexibility of those who work for them. In contrast, managers who are process experts increase temporal flexibility for everyone on their teams. Further, individuals can claim temporal flexibility if they are perceived as experts—in other words, expertise excuses individuals from living up to the "ideal worker myth." In order for the perception of expertise to be constructed in subordinate-supervisor relationships, interpersonal trust is essential. We will discuss the complex interplay between expertise, trust, and temporal flexibility and the implication of our findings for theory and practice.

Biographies

Dr. Špela Trefalt studies issues of managing the competing demands of work and life outside of work, especially among professionals. She is particularly interested in the role of relationships at work in this process. Her research aims at deepening our understanding of the experiences of individuals with work and non-work demands in order to provide ideas for improving individuals' well-being by combining their own agency and organizational change. Her research has been published in Academy of Management Journal, European Management Journal, Journal of Business Ethics Education, Work and Family Encyclopedia, as a CGO Insight, and in several edited volumes. She joined Simmons faculty in 2008, after earning her D.B.A. in Management from the Harvard Business School, her M.B.A. from the University of Kansas, and her B.A. in Law from the University of Ljubljana in Slovenia. She teaches in the MBA and in Executive Education programs. Prior to her academic career, Trefalt spent six years as a human resources management consultant, and eight years working in the media in Slovenia.

Professor Emily Heaphy received her PhD from the University of Michigan and a Bachelor of Arts from Wellesley College. She joined Boston University's School of Management in 2008, after a year at the Desautels Faculty of Management at McGill University. Emily has two streams of research. First, her research on high quality connections articulates what positive work relationships are and how they make a difference at work. As part of this research stream, she has integrated medical and sociological research about the human body into the study of workplace relationships. While scholars typically think of the body as the object of workplace stress or injury, she argues that positive work relationships are a source of physical strength, agency, and effectiveness. She is active in the Positive Work Relationships Micro-community. In a second area of research, Emily examines individual-level agency. Much of this research is based on her dissertation, a qualitative study of hospital-employed patient advocates. Through this research she is examining how individuals draw on aspects of their social context to make small changes in organizations. Her research has appeared in the Academy of Management Review, Organization Science, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, Harvard Business Review, American Behavioral Scientist, Hormones and Behavior as well as several edited collections.

*Both authors contributed equally.


Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Carla Harris: Career, Identity and Leadership

Come to CGO and be MBA for a day! Harvard Business School Professor Lakshmi Ramarajan and colleague Alex Radu have written a new case on career, leadership and identity in the financial services industry that will be showcased at CGO, taught by our own Professor Stacy Blake-Beard. Please join us for a fun, engaging discussion that pushes our thinking on the role of identity in leadership and career decisions. Those who RSVP will receive an email with a copy of the case which we ask that you read before the event. Stacy will lead us in a case discussion of the issues and Lakshmi will join her to facilitate a de-briefing of the discussion, pulling out issues that help us explore the role of social identity at work.

Summary of the Case

Carla Harris is a highly regarded Managing Director at Morgan Stanley. She is an African-American woman, an accomplished gospel singer, an observant Catholic and a philanthropist, public speaker and writer. The case follows her story from childhood to the eve of her 25th year at Morgan Stanley. Harris desires to have an impact on helping all people thrive at work by using all of her professional and personal resources. She starts a risky and ambitious project to create a fund for emerging asset managers with a focus on minority and female asset managers. However, she faces numerous challenges because of the financial crisis. She now faces a dilemma regarding whether to pull back from the project, and if so, what she should do next to advance her mission and also hold onto all the different aspects of herself that she values.


Biographies

Lakshmi Ramarajan
is an Assistant Professor in the Organizational Behavior Unit at Harvard Business School. Her research examines the management and consequences of identities in organizations.

Lakshmi's research examines how people can work fruitfully across social divides, with a particular emphasis on identities, group boundaries and intergroup relations. Her research asks two broad questions related to bridging differences across multiple identities and group boundaries: 1) What are the effects of managing multiple identities on interpersonal and intergroup relations? and 2) How do organizational and intergroup boundaries influence individuals' multiple identities and intergroup relationships? In recent work she examines how individuals' manage their organizational, ethnic, religious and national identities, and how these identities interact to influence interpersonal problem solving and prosocial attitudes and behavior.

Lakshmi earned her B.A. (Honors) in International Relations from Wellesley College, her M.Sc. in International Relations from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and her PhD in Management from The Wharton School of Business. She was awarded the State Farm Foundation Dissertation Proposal Award in 2008. She was a Post Doctoral Fellow at Harvard Business School from 2008 to 2010.

Prior to her academic career, Lakshmi worked in international development, managing conflict resolution programs in West Africa with a focus on gender and workforce development. She was also a professional dancer for several years.

Alex Radu graduated from Harvard Business School in 2012. After receiving a BA in Economics and Government from Harvard College in 2008, he worked in private equity and investment banking at Morgan Stanley in New York. He currently works at The Blackstone Group, a global principal investments firm. He enjoys flying, sailing and traveling.

Stacy Blake-Beard is a Professor of Management at the Simmons School of Management where she teaches organizational behavior. She is also Faculty Affiliate at the Center for Gender in Organizations at Simmons and Visiting Faculty at the Indian School of Business in Hyderabad, India. Prior to joining Simmons, Dr. Blake-Beard was faculty at the Harvard University Graduate School of Education. She has also worked in sales and marketing at Procter & Gamble and in the corporate human resources department at Xerox. Dr. Blake-Beard holds a BS in Psychology from the University of Maryland at College Park and an MA and a Ph.D. in Organizational Psychology from the University of Michigan.

Dr. Blake-Beard's research focuses on the challenges and opportunities offered by mentoring relationships, with a focus on how these relationships may be changing as a result of increasing workforce diversity. She is particularly interested in the issues women face as they develop mentoring relationships. She also studies the dynamics of formal mentoring programs in both corporate and educational settings. Dr. Blake-Beard has published research on gender, diversity, and mentoring in several publications including the Journal of Career Development, the Academy of Management Executive, the Psychology of Women Quarterly, Journal of Management Development, the Journal of Business Ethics, Human Resource Management Journal and The Diversity Factor. She has received a 2010-2011 Fulbright Award to support her project, entitled "Systems of Sustenance and Support: Exploring the Impact of Mentoring on the Career Experiences of Indian Women," in partnership with the Center for Leadership, Innovation and Change at the Indian School of Business in Hyderabad, India.

Dr. Blake-Beard sits on the advisory board of a number of organizations, including MentorNet, Teen Voices, the Harvard Project on Tenure, and the Harvard Medical School Center for the Study of Diversity in Science. Dr. Blake-Beard has been the recipient of numerous grants and fellowships, including awards from the National Science Foundation, the Ford Foundation and the Robert Toigo Foundation. She has given seminars for and consulted on a wide range of topics, including effectively leveraging diversity, implementing formal mentoring programs, gender and leadership, bystander awareness training, unconscious bias, managing visibility, career action planning and team-building. Organizations with which she has consulted include Infosys, EMC, Hewlett Packard, Jobs for the Future, The Partnership, IBM, Cisco, The Robert Toigo Foundation, Bank of America, Chase Manhattan Bank, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Swissotel, PepsiCo, Goldman Sachs, Intel, Linkage, AstraZeneca, Eli Lilly, Boston Chamber of Commerce, The Conference Board, Massachusetts General Hospital, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Cambridge Hospital, Boston University, Connecticut College, University of Connecticut, University of Michigan, University of Texas, University of California, Harvard University, Boston Public School District, The PhD Project, The Compact for Faculty Diversity, New Leaders for New Schools and Working Mother Media.

 


Tuesday, October 1, 2013

"Opting In-Between: Making Gender Equality Real"

The debate and discussion about gender roles roars on, ignited to fever pitch by provocative books and articles with compelling titles such as The Opt-Out Revolution, The End of Men and Lean In. But the black and white, either-or discussion- with a substantial dose of which gender is to blame- seemingly keeps us in an endless loop that is getting us nowhere. The real solution to the work-life conundrum- neither common nor rare- is a far more shared and moderate approach for putting together the pieces of the work-life equation. There are many untold stories or women and men architecting a new road forward for combining satisfying work with the ability to honor other priorities in their lives.

Come learn about a partnership approach that frees both women and men to seek professional fulfillment and deep involvement with their families. Discover how the Libra Approach is beneficial not only for women, men and children, but also for the organizations where they work. Let's focus on breaking the gender lock with new role models of success, a far more creative approach to career design, and a work and life model for the 21st century.

Biography

Lisa Levey is a veteran consultant, having worked for nearly two decades with many of the most admired companies in the world to assist them in the creation of work environments where women (and men) can thrive. In 2012 Lisa published The Libra Solution: Shedding Excess and Redefining Success at Work and at Home, profiling a highly-shared and gender-flexible career and family management model for dual career couples. Lisa is the Women's Advancement and Work-Life Thought Leader for Diversity Best Practices, providing a fresh perspective on the continuing evolution of gender roles in both the personal and professional spheres.

Some of Lisa's clients include Johnson & Johnson, Exxon Mobil, the New York City Bar, Campbell Soup Company, Texas Instruments, and Wal-Mart. Lisa's international work has encompassed consulting to the United Nations on work-life strategy in the creation of UN Women in 2011 and with the Icelandic Ministry of Trade and Industry on placing women on corporate boards. Lisa has been quoted in the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, the Washington Post, and Real Simple magazine, among other publications, and has spoken at industry conferences and corporate events on diversity, women's development, and work-life management.

Lisa spent several years as a Senior Director in Advisory Services at Catalyst, spearheading the development of the work-life effectiveness workshop delivered to senior leaders and management at all levels and heading up the employee network practice. She also played a key role in the development of the women's advancement practice at WFD (formerly Work/Family Directions). Her first career was in investment management as a research analyst and associate portfolio manager.

Lisa and her husband Bryan have been featured in Fast Company magazine and on ABC News with Charlie Gibson in stories about a parternship approach to parenting and professional work. They are raising two sons. Lisa earned an MBA with highest honors from Simmons School of Management (the only business school developed specifically for women leaders) and a BS with distinction from Cornell University in applied economics.


Wednesday, April 10, 2013

"Time Practices and Cultural Scripts"

Norms about time — how it is used, what it signifies and how it is controlled — are often used as an exemplar of gendered organizational assumptions. Indeed, the issue of time practices is central to work/life discussions not only in developed countries, but also in emergent countries including Mexico. In this session, Mayra Ruiz Castro will unpack our understanding of the gendered nature of time practices with findings from a recent research study of professional services firms in Mexico. Her research paid special attention to the social and cultural determinates of time demands and found that it was a particular cultural script related to masculinity —paternalistic masculinity — that influenced organizational norms and assumptions about the use of time. She will describe the key elements of paternalistic masculinity and contrast it to competitive masculinity, which is characteristic of professional service firms in Western countries. Using detailed accounts from managers and staff, she will highlight how the clash between time demands and gender roles had an impact on males and females, both at home and at work.
The presentation will be followed by a panel discussion with Evangelina Holvino and Michal Frenkel, who will comment on Mayra's findings through the lens of cultural scripts and cultural repertoires. This seminar is of interest for both practitioners and scholars interested in understanding the interplay between local cultures and global organizational practices.

Biographies

Mayra Ruiz Castro, Ph.D., is Visiting Scholar at the Center for Gender in Organizations (CGO) at the Simmons School of Management. She earned her doctorate in Development, Organizations and Gender from the University College London (UK). She recently worked at the University of Stuttgart, where she conducted an evaluation of mentoring programs for women in German universities. Her research interests include the study of gendered organizational practices in developing countries and the organizational, institutional and societal contexts in which they are embedded. Previous to her career in Europe and the U.S., she worked for leading multinational corporations in Mexico in the areas of human resources and corporate and social responsibility.

Evangelina Holvino, Ed.D., is President of Chaos Management, Ltd. and an Affiliate Faculty at the Center for Gender in Organizations (CGO) at the Simmons School of Management. Her research and consulting practice focus on diversity and equality strategies in organizations and the simultaneity of race, gender, ethnicity, class and other social differences. She currently leads the "Gender in All Its Complexities" grant at CGO.

Michal Frenkel, Ph.D., Michal Frenkel is a Senior Lecturer at the department of Sociology and Anthropology, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Her research focuses on the transformation of local and transnational social orders, in the context of the "globalization" of management practices. Her current studies look at gender related and organizational work family policies, and the ways in which they are framed in different cultural and institutional settings and transform as they travel across cultural boundaries. Her empirical and theoretical publications, which appeared in top journals, have looked at the role of organizational and aesthetics practices in constructing and reconstructing members' gender, ethnic and class identities. In the 2012-2013 academic year Michal is a Schusterman Visiting Professor of Israel Studies and Sociology at Smith College.


Monday, February 4, 2013

(Rescheduled from 10/31/12) "Whole Self or Best Self? Identity Expansion and the Building of Positive Relationships at Work"

This session, presented by Stephanie Creary, is designed to explore the concept of "identity expansion" and provide insight on how we as individuals can embrace our complex identities at work as well as manage identity discrepant-feedback. Through illustrative examples and interactive discussion, Stephanie will explore the different admonitions we often get to bring both our "whole selves" and our "best selves" to work. The presentation will introduce a framework that elaborates what it means to expand one's identity in social encounters at work and engage us in an interactive discussion about the practical implications of this framework for creating high quality connections in the workplace.

Biographies

Stephanie J. Creary is a doctoral candidate in the PhD program in Organization Studies at Boston College Carroll School of Management. Her research interests center on how individuals manage their multiple identities in diverse work environments and how these identities may be used as a resource for individuals, their relationships with others, and for the organizations in which they work. Creary's background and past experiences working as a health care professional informs much of her research. Recently, Creary worked at Harvard Business School as a researcher conducting field research and publishing management case studies and at The Conference Board in NYC as a researcher publishing management research for diversity and human resource practitioners working in the corporate, non-profit and government sectors. She holds an MBA with high honors from Simmons College School of Management, a BS in Communication disorders and MS in speech-language pathology from Boston University Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, and an MS in Organization Studies from Boston College Carroll School of Management.

Laura Morgan Roberts, PhD, is an author, professor, researcher and organizational consultant. She is the Professor of Psychology, Culture and Organization Studies in Antioch University's Ph.D. Program in Leadership and Change. Dr. Roberts has served on the faculties of several of the world's top-ranked business schools: Harvard, University of Michigan, Wharton, Simmons, Georgia State and Tuck. She is also a faculty affiliate of the AVT Business School (Copenhagen, Denmark), the Center for Positive Organizational Scholarship (Ann Arbor), and the Center for Gender in Organizations (Boston). A thought leader in the areas of authenticity, identity, diversity, strengths, and value creation, Dr. Roberts has published an edited book, Exploring Positive Identities and Organizations (Roberts & Dutton, Eds.), and dozens of top-ranked, book chapters, and case studies.

Dr. Roberts earned a BA in Psychology with highest distinction and graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Virginia. She received her MA and Ph.D. in Organizational Psychology from the University of Michigan. She lives near Atlanta, Georgia with her husband and business partner, Rev. Darryl D. Roberts, JD, MDiv, and their daughter.

Brianna Barker Caza, PhD, is a Senior Lecturer in the department of Employment Relations and Human Resources at Griffith Business School in Brisbane, Australia. She earned her doctorate in Organizational Psychology from the University of Michigan and has previously held a faculty positions at the University of Illinois, Wake Forest University and the Center for Creative Leadership. The overall aim of her research program is to understand the resources and processes that produce resilience at work. Within this framework her work falls into three interrelated streams of research. The first examines how individuals perceive, experience and react to adversity or setbacks in the workplace. This includes issues involving work crises, interpersonal conflict, incivility, and organizational (in)justice. The second stream of research focuses the nature, construction, and importance of individual and social resources that are used in creating functional responses to this adversity. Important resources include work identity, perceived meaningfulness of work, creativity, relational capabilities, and social support. Third, she examines the processes that foster resilience including cognitive flexibility, behavioral adaptability, and identity confirmation


Thursday, December 6, 2012

"The Global Woman Manager: The Story behind the Story"

The global woman manager is portrayed in the international management literature as balancing her life so she can move around the globe apace with high status men. But what is implied in this portrait, and who is missing from the picture? Who is the global woman manager, and how do depictions of her both reveal and obscure the flow of work and opportunities in a transnational world?

Biographies

Evangelina Holvino, Ed.D.,
is President of Chaos Management, Ltd. and an Affiliate Faculty at the Center for Gender in Organizations (CGO) at the Simmons School of Management. Her research and consulting practice focus on diversity and equality strategies in organizations and the simultaneity of race, gender, ethnicity, class and other social differences. She currently leads the "Gender in All Its Complexities"
grant at CGO.

Maureen Scully is an associate professor of management and associate dean for graduate programs at the College of Management at the University of Massachusetts Boston. She is also a faculty affiliated at the Center for Gender in Organizations at the Simmons School of Management. Her research interests include how inequality is legitimated by meritocratic ideology and how inequality is sometimes exposed and contested, particularly through grassroots efforts inside organizations.

Banu Özkazanç-Pan is an assistant professor of management and international business at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. Her research interests include examining globalization, gender and development, and inequality in society and organizations through feminist lenses. Currently, she uses postcolonial and transnational feminist perspectives to examine entrepreneurship and identity formation.


Monday, October 1, 2012

"Gender, Status and Organizational Change: How Status-Based Counter Tactics Can Block Organizational Change"

Dual agenda change efforts linking equity and effectiveness are the hallmark of what we call the "CGO approach" to challenging gendered organizations. Professor Kellogg's recent research in surgical units of two prestigious hospitals advances our understanding of dual agenda change in some unexpected ways. Counterintuitively, she found that a change in work rules designed to improve patient safety (effectiveness) and quality of work and personal life for surgical staff (equity) sparked strong opposition, even from those who would benefit personally from the change. In this presentation she details the specific micro-process that led to success in one hospital and the surprising counter tactics -- linking gender and status — that undermined the multi-identity coalitions necessary for change and led to failure in the other. This presentation will be of interest not only to health care practitioners and organizational change agents but also to gender scholars interested in exploring the inner workings of gendered organizational norms and work practices.

Biography

Kate Kellogg, MBA, PhD,
 is an Associate Professor of Organization Studies at the MIT Sloan School of Management. Her research focuses on social change inside organizations in response to social movements and her papers have been published in the American Journal of Sociology, the American Sociological Review, and Organization Science. Her recent book, Challenging Operations: Medical Reform and Resistance in Surgery (2011 University of Chicago Press) has been widely acclaimed as a ground breaking study of organizational change.