Exhibits

  • Joseph Douillette, My First Time Mushroom Hunting, 2007, video still, 5 min.
  • Judith Klausner, Gummy Stained Glass: Peacock, 2012, gummy candies, chewing gum, plexiglass 36” x 24” X ¾”; photo credit: Steve Pomeroy
  • Tara Sellios, Untitled No. 11 (from the series Impulses), 2012, digital C-print, 30” x24”, Courtesy of Gallery Kayafas
  • Rebecca Colón, The Way I See It, 2012, HD video still
  • Joseph Douillette, Giving In, 2013, video still, 1:11
  • Judith Klausner, Oreo Cameo #14, 2013, Oreo sandwich cookie, 2 x 2 x 1/4", Photo credit: Steve Pomeroy
  • Tara Sellios, Untitled No. 3 (from the series Seven Evil Thoughts) 2010, digital C-print, 20 x 96", each panel 20 x 16"

Comestibles

Video, Photography and Mixed Media by Rebecca Colón, Joseph Douillette, Judith Klausner and Tara Sellios

November 11 - December 13, 2013

Reception: Thursday, November 14, 5-7 p.m

Simmons College presents Comestibles, an exhibit of video by Rebecca Colón, Joseph Douilliette, mixed media by Judith Klausner and photography by Tara Sellios from November 12 - December 13 at the Trustman Art Gallery, located on the fourth floor, Main College Building, 300 the Fenway in Boston. A reception from 5-7 p.m. will be held on Thursday, November 14. The exhibit and reception are free and open to the public. (closed November 27-29).

Our relationship with food is commodified, sensual, disconnected and celebratory. The artists in Comestibles challenge us about our consumption decisions. The issues they raise may shock or amuse us, reference art historical perspectives and at the same time ask questions about social aspects of food.  What the Comestibles show is not—is your everyday magazine presentation of good things on your plate.

Rebecca Colón's video work The Way I See It draws on her personal experience as a farmer in the midwest. Colón shows us current industrial farming methods as well as an insider's look at the people who raise our food. The tension between two common outlooks - the romantic deep connection to the land versus mechanized soulless industry are deconstructed with quiet authenticity as we follow the seasons of the year and the tasks required.

Joseph Douillette presents two videos, both of which are wittily charming. As the artist narrates his first- time experience in hunting for mushrooms we identify with his anxieties: blending into a new social setting, and the search for and consumption of food, that if misidentified, will kill or sicken him.  We also feel his sheer pleasure in foraging for a meal. His second video is a tour de force of epicurean pleasure.

Judith Klausner has a way with food--literally. She carves Oreo cookies into facsimiles of cameo jewelry and embroiders on toast or Corn Chex. Hers is the art of misdirection. We are at first delightedly pleased with her transformations, but she asks deeper questions. How do we spend our time and energy? Is “from scratch,” old-fashioned food prep a trap that we now have a choice to escape? Historically, especially for women, these tasks of the past were demanding and relentless. 

Tara Sellios' photographs are gorgeously repellent. Her horizontal presentations describe the carnal truth of consuming live creatures - the blood, bones, and breakage. Her progressions of the feast remind us of the evanescence of life. These stark images from the series Seven Evil Thoughts evoke both poetic despair and the sublime.

Trustman Gallery hours are 10 a.m.- 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. The gallery is free, open to the public and wheelchair accessible. For more information, contact Marcia Lomedico at 617-521-2268.

Related

Sitemap